NEUROSTRUCTURAL
TECHNIQUE

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What is it?

Neurostructural Technique (NST) is a uniquely versatile and noninvasive holistic approach to total body balancing. The technique is a series of simple, gentle moves across the muscles, tendons, and ligaments. Therapeutic “wait” times between moves allows the brain to interpret the neurological impulses sending healing powers throughout the body. The restorative process begins when the muscle tension and soft tissue releases occur. This stimulates and balances the Autonomic Nervous System creating homeostasis at the cellular level. Health issues begin to resolve from the most critical to the subconscious.

NST (Neurostructural Technique) has shown to: 

  • Relieve muscle strain and tension improving lymphatic drainage

  • Open energy flow like acupuncture without using needles

  • Change energy flow in the body like acupressure, yet more gentle

  • Be extremely effective for functional illness and pain

NST CAN HAVE EXCEPTIONAL RESULTS WITH:

CONSTIPATION

NST PRACTITIONERS NOTED THESE RESULTS IN THEIR CLIENTS:

85%

EFFECTUAL IN BACK PAIN AVERAGING 4 SESSIONS

85%

EFFECTUAL IN NECK PAIN AVERAGING 4-5 SESSIONS

83%

EFFECTUAL IN STRESS AND TENSION AVERAGING 4 SESSIONS

83%

EFFECTUAL IN "OTHER" CONCERNS AVERAGING 6 SESSIONS

UPON COMPLETION OF THEIR SESSIONS, NST CLIENTS REPORTED THESE RESULTS:

85%

EFFECTUAL IN BACK PAIN

80%

EFFECTUAL IN STRESS & TENSION

80%

EFFECTUAL IN FIBROMYALGIA

90%

EFFECTUAL IN TMJ

80%

EFFECTUAL IN HIP PAIN

75.6%

EFFECTUAL IN OTHER CONCERNS

Further studies* indicate that NST soft tissue release consistently improves an individual’s confidence, perspective, and self-esteem. Subjective feelings of relaxation correlated with decreased heart rate variability and muscle tension allowing anger, depression, fatigue, and confusion to dissipate. This calming of the fight or flight system allows the Parasympathetic Nervous System to enhance the healing process of the body.

*A study presented at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Physical Education, Exercise, and Sports Science concluded these results.

BOWEN THERAPY

What is it?

Bowen therapy, also called Bowenwork or Bowtech, is a form of bodywork. It involves gently stretching the fascia — the soft tissue that covers all your muscles and organs — to promote pain relief.

Specifically, this form of therapy uses precise and gentle, rolling hand movements. These motions focus on the muscles, tendons, and ligaments, along with the fascia and skin around them. The idea is to reduce pain by stimulating the nervous system.  This type of therapy acts on the autonomic nervous system to inhibit the sympathetic nervous system (your fight-or-flight response) and activate the parasympathetic nervous system (your rest-and-digest response).

The technique was created by Thomas Ambrose Bowen (1916–1982) in Australia. Though Bowen wasn’t a medical practitioner, he claimed the therapy could reset the body’s pain response.

Some people refer to Bowen therapy as a type of massage. It isn’t a medical treatment, though. There’s minimal scientific research on its effectiveness, and its purported benefits are mainly anecdotal. Yet, people around the world continue to seek Bowen therapy for a wide range of conditions.

What’s it typically used for?
Bowen therapy is used to treat a variety of ailments. Generally, it’s done to relieve pain and increase motor function. Depending on the underlying symptoms, it may be used as a complementary or alternative treatment.

The method may be used to treat the following ailments:

  • frozen shoulder

  • headaches and migraine attacks

  • back pain

  • neck pain

  • knee injuries


It might also be done to control pain due to:

  • respiratory conditions, like asthma

  • gastrointestinal disorders, like irritable bowel syndrome

  • cancer treatment


Additionally, some people use Bowen therapy to help with:

  • stress

  • fatigue

  • depression

  • anxiety

  • high blood pressure

  • flexibility

  • motor function


Does Bowen therapy work?
One example is a 66-year-old woman received 14 Bowen therapy sessions within 4 months. She sought the therapy due to migraine, as well as neck and jaw injuries caused by car accidents.

The sessions were performed by a professional Bowenwork practitioner who was also the author of the report. An assessment tool was used to track the client’s symptoms, changes in pain, and overall sense of well-being. During the last two sessions, the client reported no symptoms of pain. When the practitioner followed up 10 months later, the client was still free of migraine and neck pain.

There’s some research, though, that supports the use of Bowen therapy for improved flexibility and motor function.

In a 2011 study Trusted Source of 120 participants, Bowen therapy improved hamstring flexibility after one session. Another 2011 study found that 13 sessions of Bowen therapy increased motor function in participants with chronic stroke. While these studies suggest Bowen therapy could benefit pain, flexibility, and motor function, there isn’t enough solid evidence to prove that it has definitive benefits for pain-related ailments and other conditions. Again, more studies are needed.

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